knee replacement

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June 24, 2015

Is Knee Pain a Normal Part of Aging?

The simplest answer to this question? Maybe. Perhaps not the answer you were hoping for, but the fact is that, although knee pain doesn’t necessarily come with age, it is true that a large part of older folks suffer from it. It’s also true that knee pain tends to worsen with age. But does it have to be this way? Absolutely not. There are steps you can take to minimize your chances of developing knee pain as you age. For instance, are you carrying a little extra weight? Did you know that for every extra pound you carry on your body, you’re adding 4 pounds of extra weight on your knees? It’s true! In other words, if you’re just 10 pounds above your ideal body weight, you’re adding 40… that’s right, four – zero… extra pounds of pressure to your knees! Pretty sizable, when it’s put that way, isn’t it? Following is more information on knee pain and aging from knee replacement specialists in New Jersey that will help you better understand measures you can take to prevent knee pain as you move into middle age and beyond.
March 16, 2014

How Does a Knee Replacement Work?

Knees are a part of the body that are used quite often and when they fail to work or give the person a lot of pain, they can become less used and less fun for the person. By considering knee replacement in NJ with your NJ orthopedic surgeon, you’re able to get more out of the use of your knee if you have joint problems or a condition of the joint. Over 400,000 people undergo a knee replacement surgery and almost all are successful, however you may be anxious and worried about the procedure which means you need to learn a bit more about how it works and what you should expect.
November 6, 2013

How Long Does a Knee Replacement Last?

When knee replacements began to be used in the early ‘70s it was the common thinking that they would last maybe 10 years before needing to be replaced. For this reason, knee replacements were commonly only used for elderly patients. Over the years, there have been huge technological advancements in a wide variety of areas. Even though many improvements have occurred in surgical technique alone, it is not the only area which has undergone major changes. For instance there have been many improvements and advancements in the materials, design and fixation which have occurred which all work together to increase the durability of any type of joint replacement. In some patients, an orthopedic surgeon placed the knee prostheses as long ago as 30 to 40 years. But how long a knee replacement lasts varies greatly from one patient to another depending on many factors.
November 4, 2013

Recent Advances in Joint Replacements

In the United States alone there are around 200,000 total hip replacements and almost 500,000 total knee replacements each year. Most experts estimate that by the year 2030 it is likely that we could see 600,000 hip replacements a year and nearly 3 million total knee replacements. Overall, orthopedic surgeons in NJ have made total joint replacement one of the most successful modern surgical procedures. Part of this success is due to the constant improvements being made in both technological surgical techniques and the advancement of materials that are used to construct the new joints. The most recent developments in techniques and instrumentation help make joint replacements successful. Latest Materials being used for Joint Replacements Over the years there have been a wide variety of materials used to construct the components that make up joint replacements. Orthopedic surgeons have used precious metals, ivory, glass, Teflon, and several different types of synthetic materials. After years of experimentation and research, there are three materials which are typically used in joint replacements: ceramics, metal or polyethylene. Each of the joints wear in different ways and therefore different materials are used depending on the particular joint. Materials Used for Hip Replacements The hip is a ball and socket joint which is under stress as a result of rotation. Polyethylene is a specially designed plastic that has been used for years in hip replacement surgeries. The trouble was that with wear and tear a lot of damaging debris could make life difficult for the patient and require extended care to correct. The last few years have brought about changes in the design of the hip joint and the polyethylene is upgraded and constructed using radiation which creates a higher density. This helps decrease the wear and tear on the joint and keeps debris from forming. […]