Causes of Upper Back Pain

upper Back Pain CausesTrue, the upper back does not cause as many visits to the doctor as the lower back does. Because less motion occurs in the upper than the lower back, this area of the spine does not usually see as much instability as the lower back. However, just because upper back pain tends not to be as prevalent as lower back pain, upper back pain can be just as disruptive and even debilitating. For additional help in answering any question related to upper back pain contact a top back specialist in your area today.

The upper back, or the ‘thoracic spine’ (which literally means ‘pertaining to the chest’) is less likely to develop the more common spinal disorders such as ruptured or herniated disc, degenerative disc disease, and spinal stenosis. These conditions can still, however, occur in the upper back, but are more rare. Because of the limited motion that occurs in the upper back compared to the lower, there is not as much risk of degeneration in this area. Continue reading

Causes of Lower Back Pain

Lower Back PainBack pain reportedly affects 80 to 90 percent of all Americans at some point in their lives. More than half of us in this country are suffering from lower back pain right now. And lower back pain does not discriminate … both men and women are generally equally affected. In fact, lower back pain is the fifth most common reason for doctor visits in the United States. Are you one of those people? Do you find that you can’t stand or sit for very long? Do you spend a lot more time in bed than usual, just to get a little relief from your lower back pain? Do you find yourself avoiding some of the things you used to enjoy, such as going to the gym or going for walks around your Essex County neighborhood with spouse or friends? Did you know that exercise can often help to relieve back pain, whereas bed rest can actually make it worse? The causes of lower back pain are many, but the good news is that there are things you and your doctor can do to alleviate or even eliminate your lower back pain. Continue reading

What Are The Symptoms of a Herniated Disc?

Herniated DiscA disc in your body is the cushioning pads that are between the bones that make up your spinal cord. The purpose of these discs is to support the movement in the spinal column and to support the impact your body experiences. The discs are constructed in a way that they resemble a jelly donut because they are soft in the middle and tougher on the outsides. When the middle portion of the disc ruptures it is called herniation.

The symptoms of a herniated disc can vary depending on where the disc is and how big it is. If you are lucky, and the herniated disc is not pressed up against a nerve, you may not have any symptoms whatsoever. However, it if it pressing up against a nerve, you will experience pain, numbness, or weakness in the part of the body that the nerve is connected to. Here are different symptoms that may be signs that you have a herniated disc. Continue reading

What is a Slipped Disc?

Back pain

Weakness and Pain in the Back

The term, “slipped disc” is commonly used for a spinal condition which can also be referred to as a ruptured disc, herniated disc or a prolapsed disc. It does not literally mean the slipping or dislodging of a disc, but instead refers to a spinal condition where a disc is protruding abnormally and made contact with nerve tissue. Usually a slipped or herniated disc is located in the region of the lower back, but any disc along the spinal column could potentially rupture. This also includes the discs that are in the neck region. Continue reading